10 NEW PERENNIAL FLOWERS TO PLANT THIS FALL

10 NEW PERENNIAL FLOWERS TO PLANT THIS FALL

We’re not there yet, but it is time to start thinking about planting perennials in the fall. This list consists of new varieties of ten old favorites including Penstemon, Daylily, Coneflower, Helenium and Astilbe. The details are set out in an article by Amanda which I found on the American Meadows website.

Here at American Meadows, many of us are already sketching, planning and organizing our thoughts around the excitement of fall planting. Part of that fun includes the anticipation that builds knowing that our garden experts will soon reveal their selections of the new and unique perennials they’ve scouted for this season.
Are you ready? Here it is, our short list of inspiring, new perennials, perfect for planting this fall!

1. Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon digitalis

Penstemon digitalis is a beautiful plant that produces white blossoms from sturdy stalks, reaching up to 5’ in height. The tubular-shaped flowers are excellent for feeding both hummingbirds and bees. Penstemon prefers well-drained loam and sandy soils; however, it will tolerate clay. Blooms in late spring to mid summer.
Advantages: Attracts Bees, Native, Deer Resistant, Great Cut Flowers
Height: 24-60″ Tall
Hardiness Zone: 3-8

2. Daylily Daring Deception

daylily-pinkish
With slightly ruffled petals and dramatic light pink-burgundy blooms, Daring Deception is a must-have for any Daylily lover. Mature plants produce up to 500 blooms. This fantastic re-blooming variety flowers all summer long and attracts butterflies to your garden.
Advantages: Attracts Butterflies and Hummingbirds, Easy to Grow, Multiplies
Height: 18-24″ Tall
Hardiness Zone: 4-9

Go to the next page to see more new perennial varieties

75 thoughts on “10 NEW PERENNIAL FLOWERS TO PLANT THIS FALL

  1. My astilbe took a beating this summer – we had a caterpillar infestation in June – they were literally crawling up the sides of the house – and my husband sprinkled lime around the house to kill the smell. Well, the astilbe weren’t too happy!

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